Author Topic: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread  (Read 35341 times)

Miradus

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #975 on: February 14, 2018, 01:33:21 PM »

Heh. It's surreal here.

Yesterday I got a sledgehammer and a metal bar out of my toolbox. My wife says, "What are you about to do?"

Me: "Plant a tree."

You've essentially got to chisel out a hole in the rock to put dirt in.

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #976 on: February 14, 2018, 01:42:36 PM »
Were I in your position, my new punishment of choice for my sons would be breakin rocks :D

Hard work is the best form of punishment, because it is productive. My father made me dig.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Miradus

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #977 on: February 14, 2018, 02:04:36 PM »
Were I in your position, my new punishment of choice for my sons would be breakin rocks :D

Hard work is the best form of punishment, because it is productive. My father made me dig.

Heh. I don't do that. Mostly because my father did that to me.

I'd get in trouble and have to clean out the barn or some other awful ranch chore. But then other times I wouldn't be in trouble at all and I STILL had to clean out the barn or some other awful ranch chore. So the lines between what was normal life and what was punishment were blurred in my mind. And for many a year into my adulthood, I saw hard work AS punishment and avoided it.

A certain amount of hard work is required for being alive and if you learn to enjoy it for its own sake then it's not as awful. Right now, with the exception of the two teenagers, the kids see me heading out with some tools and they suddenly glue themselves to my hip with "What you doing, Daddy?" "Going to plant a tree. Want to help?" "Sure!"

To get the two teenagers to get involved, the internet has to mysteriously break. They'll then yawn, open their eyes, wander out onto the porch, and look for something to do. I break the internet a lot.


Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #978 on: February 14, 2018, 02:29:50 PM »
Hahahahaha. Dad-skills.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

X-D

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #979 on: February 15, 2018, 03:49:15 AM »
Here in Arkansas, my property, very rocky. When I was putting in my septic it was backhoe, which handled even the rocks up to 1000lbs, but the bigger ones meant explosives...WEEEEEE...that was fun.

As to garden. First, set up electric fence, put hogs inside, go out every day for a week picking up the rocks they root up. Think of something to build with all the rocks. Move hogs to next section, put chickens in first section...wait a week, nicely conditioned and fertilized soil. Move bottom electric wire to 6 inches from ground, move top wire to 6  foot above ground, leave other two wires at 18 and 28 inches. Now garden protected from rabbits, deer, the darn pushy horses, chickens, guinea fowl and whatever else is around that wants my tasty veggies. Well, will not stop the wild hogs...but I have a better answer for that in .303 .308 .30-06 .45 .50 etc. Them be some darn tasty pigs.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 03:53:34 AM by X-D »
A gaunt, yellow-skinned gith shrieks in fear, and hauls ass.
Lizzie:
If you -want- me to think that your character is a hybrid of a black kryl and a white push-broom shaped like a penis, then you've done a great job

Miradus

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #980 on: February 15, 2018, 01:29:15 PM »
Arkansas be known for the efficacy of dem hogs. :)

Here the big island is only 300,000 years old. There's no soil. Nowhere. Well, not exactly true in that there are a few rare places, I hear tell, that have been untouched by lava flows. But the area I'm in has been criss-crossed a half dozen times over the past two centuries, so there's a 12' layer of rock going one way, and an 8' layer going another, and other layers even deeper than that. The property next door has a collapsed lava tube on it which means there's probably lava tubes under mine too. Up further west from me, maybe 15 miles up the mountain, people complain that their ground is "hot", meaning active lava flowing beneath it. Well, yeah, brah. You live in a town called "Volcano" and your main industry is tourists coming to peer down into the glowing crater that is Kilauea. The ground may be occasionally hot. :)

Soil happens though and there's a couple of spots on my property where you had a couple of inches of it. And there's another spot where I threw a coconut and it sprouted in a brushpile, sending out roots into the decaying ferns and sparse soil to find the rock. Go, coconut, go.

Everyone likes coconut trees, but they're generally just a menace. Nobody likes a 4 pound weight dropping off from 30' up to hit your windshield, your picnic table, or your head.


Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #981 on: February 15, 2018, 01:47:09 PM »
Oh, Mir. idk if I mentioned it before, I probably did, but its worth it. Harvest buckets of seaweed for your compost pile one five-gallon bucket at a time. Thats good stuff, man.

X-D, thats super smart using the hogs to do some work for you. I've never kept hogs, yet, so thanks for that tip. My land has a ton of limestone in the soil, but a forest has since sprouted up, so the topsoil is lovely.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

X-D

  • Posts: 5516
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #982 on: February 16, 2018, 12:04:42 AM »
You would be amazed the number and size of rocks a couple hogs will root up every day. Long as you make sure to remove them so they do not get covered back up, you can have a 50'x50' area clear of major rocks to about a foot deep in a week. Although, this year I am having them clear a 30x40 section then the 30x40 section next to it. And I am not kidding about thinking of things to build either...I have so many piles of rocks and boulders to use up...eesh.
A gaunt, yellow-skinned gith shrieks in fear, and hauls ass.
Lizzie:
If you -want- me to think that your character is a hybrid of a black kryl and a white push-broom shaped like a penis, then you've done a great job

Cind

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #983 on: February 16, 2018, 03:39:45 AM »
We have mini-pigs that require less feed than normal pigs if people are thinking of getting a few to root, but they're expensive to buy because they're considered a pet, and sometimes you have to stay home all day because someone drove from Atlanta to look at your piglets and not buy any. But at $80-$160 a piglet, with 3-5 piglets a batch, they pay for themselves fairly good, at half or less the cost of feed, I think, of normal pigs, especially those kinds that grow into huge dinosaurs. They may not root deep enough, I'm not sure but they do root pretty good, especially Mr. Bacon. He just spends -all day- rooting and turning over his water bucket if it hasn't been turned over yet.

If you find yourself with mini-pigs of both genders and end up having piglets you want to get rid of, I'll just say that both genders are in demand, the smaller the better, girls are a bit more in demand than boys, and special colors like partially white ones and deerskin ones will sell first. The deerskin more, I think, but you will want to explain to the buyer that they will turn grey after a year. We've had a few that look like dalmations on their lower halves (the partially white ones). The genetics of color tend to vary with the parents, just because the parents are pure black doesn't mean they won't have colorful children, so you can experiment and see which fathers and mothers produce the rare colors in their offsprings.

People who come to see them are far more variable in their opinions and whether they will buy, its quite funny sometimes. When you hold the piglets with your bare hands, they squeal. If you stuff them in your jacket or in a blanket, they tend to be quiet and allow you to hold them. Mini-pigs tend to attach to one person and may do so early, so 'training' them by holding them for a while every day may not be the best if you're trying to sell them.
Look, a petting tregil.  So silky...Feel him.

boog

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #984 on: February 16, 2018, 08:38:39 AM »
Aren't mini pigs just starved versions of regular pigs? I know teacup pigs are.
Case: he's more likely to shoot up a mcdonalds for selling secret obama sauce on its big macs
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Refugee

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #985 on: February 16, 2018, 12:24:31 PM »
My friend had his rabbitry attacked by large dogs in broad daylight.  They flung themselves at the door until the latch bent, he had a latch like you use on a bathroom stall.  They then broke into some cages, and in other cages they bit at the toes and feet and left rabbits crippled that had to be killed.  He lost 20 rabbits and several cages.  Killed all his lovely pedigreed stock.  He caught one of the dogs and chained it but it got loose.  The cops and Animal Control won't even come out, just told him to keep the pictures and try to find out himself whose dogs they were.  Guy's left with only 2 breeding age does and no bucks, and a bunch of growouts.

I'm gonna find ways to make mine stronger.  It's just inside one of those chainlink dog kennels.

Delirium

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #986 on: February 16, 2018, 01:06:45 PM »
That's terrible :(

My grandpa used to raise rabbits as well, and one time I just fell in love with a little black bunny, so I convinced my dad to let me have it as a pet. He wouldn't let me keep it inside, so he built a hutch for it... and then a week later the dogs from the farmer down the road got at it. I was... not happy.

Will they tell your story in the end?
Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?

Miradus

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #987 on: February 16, 2018, 02:08:20 PM »
My friend had his rabbitry attacked by large dogs in broad daylight.  They flung themselves at the door until the latch bent, he had a latch like you use on a bathroom stall.  They then broke into some cages, and in other cages they bit at the toes and feet and left rabbits crippled that had to be killed.  He lost 20 rabbits and several cages.  Killed all his lovely pedigreed stock.  He caught one of the dogs and chained it but it got loose.  The cops and Animal Control won't even come out, just told him to keep the pictures and try to find out himself whose dogs they were.  Guy's left with only 2 breeding age does and no bucks, and a bunch of growouts.

I'm gonna find ways to make mine stronger.  It's just inside one of those chainlink dog kennels.

That's why guns.

I remember everyone on this forum mocked me when I mentioned I had to shoot a neighbor's dog, but then stories like this happen and everyone is all "so sad".

Farmers in rural areas have guns for a freakin' reason. If it's not someone else's dogs, it's feral dogs that have been dumped, or coyotes or wolves. Heck, our goat pen got attacked by a black bear. By the time I got out there the bear had hightailed it but the dogs just about tried to climb up the wall to hide on the porch roof.


Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #988 on: February 16, 2018, 03:27:36 PM »
Fuck, that sucks. Ready your shotgun, Ref. Also sucks to have to put some dogs down, but they are predators when they are not controlled. No different than a coyote, save for their larger size, and stupidity.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1727
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #989 on: February 16, 2018, 06:17:35 PM »
Yep, we've got a 12ga, a .22, and an SKS loaded and hanging by the bed.  I'm gonna put a camera that looks out to the barn area I think, so if we hear anything going on we can see quickly what's needed.  We have one that looks out the driveway and it's pretty awesome.  They're so cheap now for decent ones. 

Definitely gonna beef up my rabbitry and especially my chicken coop, which is just plastic tarp over 4" woven wire.  I am surprised nothing got the chickens over the winter.  Good ol' Peckerhead has kept them safe.

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #990 on: February 16, 2018, 06:23:56 PM »
Man, Peckerhead is a star. There really is no replacement for a tough rooster.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1727
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #991 on: February 16, 2018, 07:13:03 PM »
He's awesome.  Just this week he gave a squawk and all the flock ran full speed under a 20' trailer we have parked back behind the cabin.  I looked around and up above a hawk was circling.  It's neat to see that.


Miradus

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #992 on: February 16, 2018, 09:24:09 PM »
We had a rooster once that, when a hawk circled above, he stood in the center of the field calling his alarm cry while all his hens ran to safety in the barn. He didn't break and run until the very last hen had made it to cover.

We named him Horatius after that famous Roman, a notorious ground-stander.

Horatius the Rooster unfortunately met his fate at the hands of a fox who was unimpressed with his bravery.

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #993 on: February 16, 2018, 10:31:43 PM »
If that hawk decided to swoop down, I bet Peckerhead would have fought to the death for his hens.

Noble Horatius died protecting his flock. Good bird.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

X-D

  • Posts: 5516
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #994 on: February 16, 2018, 11:01:18 PM »
Lots of stray dogs around here. Oddly, I have had no problems with any of them, Oh, they come by but cause no problems and it is amusing to see the old mare lead the two younger ones to chase them off. The one dog problem I had sadly was not a stray but a pair of dogs of the neighbor. And really only one of the two...the second dog was just along for the ride. Massive dog, Great Pyrenees, first night guinea making noise, go out with 20g loaded with #8 target loads, shoot dog, Non-lethal BTW...specially at 20 yards, stings at most. Dogs run away...I go back in. Next night, guinea fowl making even more noise. Go out with 20g this time loaded with #6 high brass, still non-lethal round to a dog that size, but this time the pellets gonna stick. So, next two nights dog free. Thinking problem solved and I did not have to kill a dog. On 3rd day, sitting at the computer and see out the window, pair of dogs passing silently heading directly for the chickens. This time I grab a different gun. Go out and the great Pyrenees is ramming the coop, literally breaking the wire from the staples. This time it was a .303 through the heart, she dropped in place. Now, I hate killing dogs, I especially hate killing a dog and it being the owners fault for not controlling or training it. But that last time, she had killed one chicken, broke the leg of another and a 3rd was gone (turned out the Americana was the only smart one and made a break and hid under the horse trailer for the next 4 hours. Still I lost 2 very good laying hens. And once the dog kills chickens it will always kill chickens and you only have the one choice.

It was very hard to keep civil when I drove the bodies over to neighbor I assure you...and of course he was not happy about losing a $500 dog and having to explain it to his daughter and wife. But they, as anybody around farm/ranch country knows, anything that threatens livestock is a pest and subject to removal, usually by use of lead. I'm still pissed about having to kill a dog.
A gaunt, yellow-skinned gith shrieks in fear, and hauls ass.
Lizzie:
If you -want- me to think that your character is a hybrid of a black kryl and a white push-broom shaped like a penis, then you've done a great job

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #995 on: February 16, 2018, 11:23:08 PM »
You gave the dog more chances than most would. Sucks, but it is what it is.

Btw, was it an Enfield you used?
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

X-D

  • Posts: 5516
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #996 on: February 16, 2018, 11:41:17 PM »
Yes...Enfield mkIII .303 british, great gun, no scope on it and I am very good with it under 200 yards...being iron sights it is my preferred large vermin rifle as I can acquire my target quickly, unlike the scoped rifles.
A gaunt, yellow-skinned gith shrieks in fear, and hauls ass.
Lizzie:
If you -want- me to think that your character is a hybrid of a black kryl and a white push-broom shaped like a penis, then you've done a great job

Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #997 on: February 17, 2018, 12:02:00 AM »
My brother had a no. 4 mk1 that he had scoped. I loved the action on that weapon, but daaammmnnnn new ammunition was pricey.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

X-D

  • Posts: 5516
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #998 on: February 17, 2018, 12:08:41 AM »
Yes...though ammo is actually becoming more common I am running federal in mine like $1.05 per round 180grs softnose.
A gaunt, yellow-skinned gith shrieks in fear, and hauls ass.
Lizzie:
If you -want- me to think that your character is a hybrid of a black kryl and a white push-broom shaped like a penis, then you've done a great job

Cind

  • Posts: 1597
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #999 on: February 17, 2018, 12:53:21 AM »
Aren't mini pigs just starved versions of regular pigs? I know teacup pigs are.

They are actually smaller, about half-size. They're like regular pigs though, in that they constantly look for ways to get out and mess with everything they have in their pen.

Its like that around here, too. People raise rabbits and chickens and pigs, sometimes goats and the occasional meat cow. Nothing has tried to get at the small dogs, but we know there's a possum with its eye on the neighbor's last chicken. (They used to have 8-9, but something got them all, one by one, and they never found out what it was.) The people who are raising more than one or two chickens tend to acquire a firearm after a while. The funny thing is that its more for wild hogs, than coyotes and loose dogs. I know the guy down the road has quite a collection. He's retired with a side business of raising rabbits. They're beautiful creatures, although I'm fairly certain they're meat rabbits. Some of them have that fluffy hair you tend to associate with the image of angora rabbits.

One guy across the street spent good money on a purebred watchdog of some sort, to look after his herd of high-end goats. It was not socialized as a puppy, and simply raised to do a particular job. I thought all dogs had a play-in-the-mud childhood and were trained a little later.
Look, a petting tregil.  So silky...Feel him.