Author Topic: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread  (Read 22840 times)

Delirium

  • Helper
  • Posts: 11658
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #850 on: October 25, 2017, 05:24:53 PM »
I bet you would also enjoy golden pothos. Very easy to maintain and propagate. If it gets leggy just snip half the vine off, stick it in the soil, and viola, it'll root.
Will they tell your story in the end?
Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?

Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #851 on: October 26, 2017, 01:46:27 AM »
They sound like suitable choices to me!

You should look into bonzais. super interesting.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

stark

  • Posts: 400
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #852 on: October 26, 2017, 10:36:11 AM »
Good idea Delirium, I've had those before and didn't have any trouble with them! No bonsai for me Melkor. True story: I bought a miniature Japanese maple tree for a few hundred dollars fifteen years ago, with plans to grow it in a huge pot inside the house. As luck would have it, I was doing a little bit of landscaping in the backyard and found a really nice Russian willow and put it into a raised bed because I knew that anything willow means wild uncontrollable growth, but not as bad as mulberry, however, it's very close. While doing this, I realized the area was pretty sheltered and if I mulched it in really well and maybe covered it, the little Japanese maple (which was supposedly as tall as it would get at three-four feet high) would make it through cold Nebraska winters. Well, it got a little bigger, but nothing you'd really notice. Then I became disabled about four and a half years ago, and three years of that I was on enough pain meds to keep me mostly sleeping 20+ hours a day. So about a year ago I started waking up more and working with biofeedback to kick the pain killers, and one day I looked out into my back yard, whining about how nobody aside from myself cared. I saw that my raspberry bushes were gone (probably mowed down by the kid that was hired to mow the yard), my holly bush was gone, my magnolia tree was just a stump, but the willow was really doing okay. Then, I saw it, my mind didn't register it at first because it didn't fit into my memory, but my little miniature dwarf Japanese maple was a thirty five foot tree. Seriously. No more little things that require attention to stay little. Trees, like children, grow up, and unless you are there to work with it and keep on top of it, BAM! You got big trees.
What kind of jerkoff shakes a tent in the dark? Go out there and see who or what that is.

Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #853 on: October 26, 2017, 11:51:10 AM »
HAHAHA!

That tree must have been so happy, though.

"NUTRIENTS!!!!" *Proceeds to shoot into the sky*
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #854 on: November 06, 2017, 03:42:20 PM »
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Delirium

  • Helper
  • Posts: 11658
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #855 on: November 09, 2017, 07:49:24 AM »
Hive mind can you help me identify the proper name for this plant? It grows/feels a lot like wandering jew but is a tropical. I'm a little obsessed with it but can't seem to find/ID it on Google.

Will they tell your story in the end?
Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?

Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #856 on: November 09, 2017, 11:44:50 AM »
Rhoeo groundcover, maybe. From mexico, and grows in florida, so tropical, too.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Delirium

  • Helper
  • Posts: 11658
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #857 on: November 09, 2017, 02:33:36 PM »
You're good! Rhoeo spathacea. Boom. ID'd.
Will they tell your story in the end?
Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?

Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #858 on: November 09, 2017, 10:12:44 PM »
*finger-guns*  ;)
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1696
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #859 on: November 09, 2017, 11:13:08 PM »
I took 7 of my growouts to a guy who wanted to buy one to beef up his breeding herd, which was smaller framed than he wanted.  He liked mine so much he bought 3!  Two does for $20 each and a buck for $15.  He even butchered out the remaining 4 for us for free.  On the way home I stopped to return a battery charger I'd borrowed from someone, and that guy bought one of the butchered rabbits for $10.  I cut him a deal because he's my sweetheart of an uncle.  He's going to tell others I will sell rabbits too.  So altogether a nice rabbit day. 

I also gave the rabbit guy one of my barred rock rooster chicks who is about 10 weeks old now.  He is trying to develop his own meat breed of chicken that grows big and fast but isn't so mutant it can't breed or walk without breaking legs...He wanted a barred roo to try to make his chicks easy to sex (you can do that with barred chickens, the males and females are obvious at hatching).  He planned to destroy the baby roos, but instead he is going to give me all I want for free.  I can raise them to eat, and give him the information on age and weight to help him with his breeding project.  Score!

Got my bees moved over into a better hive for the winter.  I hadn't looked at them for awhile and I was dismayed to find they were already mostly out of stores.  So I am feeding them already.  My queen was still alive and doing her queen things, I was glad to see, but the colony was much diminished from the last time I looked in on them.  I hope they make it through the winter.




Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #860 on: November 27, 2017, 12:44:12 AM »
Fingers crossed for your bees, ref. What are they mainly getting their sugar from up there in your neck of the woods? Clover? Bees in florida mainly feed off of wildflowers and various palms.

So, I pulled one of my carrots to check growth... super small, but tasty. I am deficient on sunlight, because I live in dense woods, especially now that the sun never getss from behind my trees.

This spring, I am going to focus on super invasive perennial crops, and keep tending to the fruit trees.

Weather update. The dry season is here, and it is finally dipping into the mid 40s at night, so I stoke the fireplace up some nights, other nights I cant be bothered, so I crank on the central air. Florida made me so soft to the cold.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1696
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #861 on: December 01, 2017, 10:52:29 AM »
There is a succession of flowering plants that contribute to the nectar flow, including blackberries (finally a use for the cursed things) and clover.  It's over in late summer.  I'm feeding them syrup and I'm going to start with candy.  I'm concerned there's not enough of them to keep themselves warm.  I guess they never recovered from the guy running them over with the truck.

We've had some night freezes already.  It makes taking care of the rabbits more burdensome.  The nozzles on the bottles freeze, so we have gone to filling crocks for them.  You have to carry warm water out and bang out the ice to refill the crocks.  It's still getting above freezing during the daytime even for the coldest days, but that's about to change. 

I still have all the little chicks I bought (except the one I gave away).  I didn't expect them all to survive.  They've been free ranging for about a month.  They have kept themselves separate from the big chickens, but some of them are now starting to venture into the woods with the big girls.  They're even allowed on the lower roost in the coop now.  Until recently they would be chased off, even though all the big chickens were on the top roost,  and were all huddling up on top of the nesting boxes.  The chicks are nearly as big as the grown chickens now so it will be interesting to see how Peckerhead accepts the young roo.

Here's a funny chicken story.  We have two ceramic eggs in a nesting box to encourage the hens to lay there instead of the woods.  We had been getting zero eggs for awhile and wondered if they were laying in the woods.  One of the ceramic eggs disappeared!  We looked all over the place for it.  I envisioned a snake with a bellyache...  Well, in a couple of days, it showed back up!  WTF!  And a fine real egg with it.  Ever since, we've had one egg to gather every day.  The ceramic egg mystery is still unsolved.

Coyotes are closing in.  It was not unusual to hear one or two of them during the summer, but now it's a pack of them and they are very close.  The 12 gauge and the SKS are loaded and hanging by the bed.

I'm hoping to add a couple of feeder pigs and a bottle calf or two to the homestead in spring.  I enjoy working with the animals more than gardening, I always have, so I am going to focus more on providing our protein and use the farmer's market for most the vegetables, though I would like to explore growing beets and other food to offset the cost of animal feed.

My hands are getting so cold now on butchering days that I am cutting myself up.  Most the time I don't realize I do it until I thaw, but last time I heard/felt the blade scrape along the bone of my knuckle.  Unpleasant...  So we are going to hang a hook in the kitchen for butchering in winter before I lose a finger.  We'll kill rabbits outside and bring them inside for cleaning.

Delirium

  • Helper
  • Posts: 11658
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #862 on: December 15, 2017, 01:38:50 AM »
I'm developing a habit of adopting sick plants to nurse them back to health. Otherwise they'll just get trashed and I hate that idea, but it's getting kind of ridiculous and I've already brought home four 'orphans'

I think I enjoy the challenge, and so far I have a 100% success rate; three orchids, two with mealybugs and root rot, and one with such terrible root rot there was only a leaf and no healthy roots left by the time I was done trimming. I repotted and babied them. All three are now putting out new leaves and roots. The single-leaf survivor took quite a while but I finally noticed a new leaf starting earlier today. Yay!

Then a peace rose with a terrible infection of black spot and fungus gnats. I had to prune it down to bare branches and repot it and take it indoors under a grow light, but now I have three new branch nubs, one of which is developing very nicely. Here's hoping.

Neem oil is a goddamn workhorse. Even if it does stink. Copper fungicide for the black spot and then regular applications of neem oil. Shit is effective.
Will they tell your story in the end?
Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?

Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #863 on: December 15, 2017, 02:04:17 AM »
What is neem oil?

I know I can google it, but I'd rather hear it from you. lol.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Delirium

  • Helper
  • Posts: 11658
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #864 on: December 15, 2017, 02:31:13 AM »
It's a horticultural oil you can get at nearly any decent garden center. It's an organic way to control/combat tons of pests, fungi and diseases while also not harming beneficial bugs or earthworms etc. The only sort-of drawback is that if you use it outside, you have to spray it on either super early in the morning or in the evening after the sun goes down. That way it has time to dry before the sun hits the foliage full force. I learned this the hard way by absolutely frying my green bean leaves in an attempt to get rid of some bugs one afternoon. Well I got rid of the bugs but I also got rid of most of my green bean leaves. And it's a bit stinky but the smell dissipates pretty quickly.
Will they tell your story in the end?
Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?

RogueGunslinger

  • Posts: 18863
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #865 on: December 18, 2017, 08:37:56 AM »
Neem is great but definitely read up on proper use. Its not something you want to eat, for instance.

boog

  • Posts: 10661
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #866 on: December 18, 2017, 08:53:57 PM »
Neem didn't do shit for me this year. I was depressed. I had an okay haul, but the amount of work I put in versus what I got was really disappointing.
Case: he's more likely to shoot up a mcdonalds for selling secret obama sauce on its big macs
Kismet: didn't see you in GQ homey
BadSkeelz: Whatever you say, Kim Jong Boog
Quote from: Tuannon
There is only one boog.

Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #867 on: December 20, 2017, 02:26:51 PM »
Off topic, but my garden needs no work for the winter, and I wanted to show off.

I forged these knives as christmas gifts. my first time doing any serious smithing. Very happy with the results.



I wanted the karambits to be nearly identical in shape, but that didnt happen, lol.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1696
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #868 on: December 23, 2017, 08:44:06 PM »
Awesome knives!  What do you forge them from?

I made a deal for next year to provide 10 young rabbits a month for a guy who sells to restaurants.  It's not much but it will more than cover my rabbitry costs.  I provide them live and he butchers in an approved mobile facility.  He says if it takes off he might ask for more.  As he wants the kits at 8 weeks old, they can stay with mama until it's time to take them off, so I don't have to invest in more cages or anything.


Melkor

  • Posts: 1113
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #869 on: December 30, 2017, 08:55:56 PM »
The two karambits came from a single rusty lawnmower blade i found in the woods. The bigger one came from a thick flat bar I picked up a while back working construction. No sense letting a good chunk of steel be thrown out.

Dude! Supplying chefs is great money! Congrats on the hookup.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1696
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #870 on: January 02, 2018, 04:13:47 PM »
It's colder than a witch's tit!  I can remember my old man saying that when I was a kid.

The water is 30" underground so we still have water so far, but every day the temperature doesn't rise above freezing the frost line gets lower...

I really don't want to go back to hauling water.  It wasn't fun in the sweltering spring, it sure won't be fun in the freezing of January.

Our little cabin is well insulated in the main area and we are not suffering.  Our bedroom, however, is not insulated at all.  We put plastic over the walls and ceiling to cut down on the draft which helped.  We had been keeping the dog's water in there but we had to move it to the main part of the cabin because it was freezing solid.  We have an electric blanket on the bed so it's nice once you get warmed up.  Memory foam pillows are like laying down on a board, lol, until your body heat gets them warm.  Electric blankets don't seem to affect them.  Nobody wants to get up in the night to go pee!  But at our age neither of us sleeps through the night anymore.  I like the heated toilet seat though!

The nipples on the rabbit water bottles freezes in no time so we have moved to crocks for the winter.  They freeze too but we dip them in warm water we carry out and the ice comes out.  We're having to do that three times a day.  All the rabbits have nesting boxes with hay in them to burrow in.  But some choose to eat the hay instead.  They all seem to be doing just fine.  The two bucks, oddly enough, made the nicest nests and keep them cleanest.

The chickens all seem to be taking it in stride.  No real change to their behavior except when there is snow on the ground.  They are not fans.  The old ones stayed in the coop.  The young ones didn't know what it was.  They ran out like they always do, then freaked out and ran back to the little brooder area we used to keep them in when they were tiny, and crowded around in that.  Odd.  Maybe they hoped for the heater lol.

We spend our days dozing in the living room and talking about what we will do in spring.  I'm hoping to add one or two bottle calves and a couple of Kunekune pigs, and expanding the rabbitry so we can unstack the cages.  The bottom ones are hard for us to work with.

How are you guys doing in winter?








Delirium

  • Helper
  • Posts: 11658
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #871 on: January 02, 2018, 05:22:04 PM »
Tend to my indoor plants and pout until April.
Will they tell your story in the end?
Who lives, who dies, who tells your story?

Miradus

  • Posts: 1976
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #872 on: January 04, 2018, 12:33:37 AM »
I have the worst winter sunburn I've ever had. :)


Refugee

  • Posts: 1696
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #873 on: January 04, 2018, 08:08:00 AM »
Ha!  Miradus!  Rub it in why don't you?  :P

Miradus

  • Posts: 1976
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread
« Reply #874 on: January 05, 2018, 12:57:54 AM »
To be fair, I can see that it snowed up on top of Mauna Loa. We had a freak cold spell here that had everyone scrambling for hoodies. Dropped down to 58F. My neighbor lost some avocado off of his trees. And I think I got about a 30 minute reprieve from the mosquito that night. Normally it's an all-you-can-drink buffet up in here.

I saw some people walking around wearing those white tube things on their feet, it was so cold. Oh yeah. I think we used to call those "socks". :)