Author Topic: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer  (Read 3796 times)


Riev

  • Posts: 5374
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2013, 02:18:57 PM »
Do like. Could learn from. +1
Masks are the Armageddon equivalent of Ed Hardy shirts.

chrisdcoulombe

  • Posts: 1229
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2013, 02:25:18 PM »
I read it.  Its good.
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Samos the salter never goes to jail! Hahaha!

Barsook

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    • The Sense of Openness
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2013, 02:37:20 PM »
Awesome guide.

Is Friday

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Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2013, 02:41:30 PM »
Man, if only it included the "No one gives a shit if you think your ninja/conan/anime hero character is super bad ass" rule.
And then I sat there going "really? that was it? that's so stupid."

I still think the best closure you get in Armageddon is just moving on to the next character.

Morrolan

  • Posts: 2760
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2013, 03:43:29 PM »
I would also add: remember the gameworld.

True story (and P-n-P PTSD):

In a sexist world, don't get personally offended that my fundamentalist Christian, upright gentleman ex-military officer is a sexist dick. Keep it IG. Shoot him for chrissakes. I would.

At the same time, don't run around in the 1870s in a bra, shooting people, and expect to be treated like a "lady." He didn't give the other women shooting people any trouble. It wasn't the violence. It was the public lewdness and expectation of equal rights, followed by playing the "treat me like a Lady" card.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2013, 03:45:10 PM by Morrolan »
"I have seen him show most of the attributes one expects of a noble: courtesy, kindness, and honor.  I would also say he is one of the most bloodthirsty bastards I have ever met."

Harmless

  • Posts: 2782
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2013, 03:58:13 PM »
i don't like the tone of this article it offends me and comes off as harsh
Useful tips: Commands |  |Storytelling:  1  2

Morrolan

  • Posts: 2760
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2013, 04:03:28 PM »
Man, if only it included the "No one gives a shit if you think your ninja/conan/anime hero character is super bad ass" rule.

Or, worse, people react realistically to your hardened killer. They're scared. They send authority figures into your way on principle. The avoid social situations with you. They panic and say threatening things because they feel threatened by your very presence. They try to save your soul and turn you from your evil ways.

But mostly, they just avoid you. And send more well-adjusted badasses to drive you away.

EDIT: In other words, they treat you about the way most VNPCs treat witches in game.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2013, 04:06:05 PM by Morrolan »
"I have seen him show most of the attributes one expects of a noble: courtesy, kindness, and honor.  I would also say he is one of the most bloodthirsty bastards I have ever met."

chrisdcoulombe

  • Posts: 1229
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2013, 04:07:46 PM »
#5 is a bad rule.
Quote from MeTekillot
Samos the salter never goes to jail! Hahaha!

Morrolan

  • Posts: 2760
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2013, 04:12:26 PM »
#5 is a bad rule.

I think it could be reworked:

If you harm other PCs, expect to be dealt with just as summarily as alleypunk#281. If other PCs harm your character, handle it like you would any other enemy.

Action: "I stole the gem! HAHHAHAHA!"

Reaction: "You are a rank betrayer who is a blight before the Highlord. In respect of our friendship, despite the fact that you betrayed it, I will tie your wrist before I cut off your hand."

It bothers me that it isn't the thief that gets in "trouble" in most games, it's the PC that actually reacts realistically.

EDIT to Add: Remember that many, many PCs effectively kill sentients for a living. Yes, even Paladins. ESPECIALLY Paladins.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2013, 04:13:59 PM by Morrolan »
"I have seen him show most of the attributes one expects of a noble: courtesy, kindness, and honor.  I would also say he is one of the most bloodthirsty bastards I have ever met."

Kismetic

  • Posts: 7006
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2013, 04:17:29 PM »
Six reminds me of Case.  Biggest.  Ruleshark.  Ever.
"Well, Gary, if that even is your real name ...  somebody stole my computer.  Now, if you're a criminal--  Look at me! ... You have to tell me, legally, or else it's considered entrapment."  -- Andy Dwyer

Vwest

  • Posts: 446
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2013, 07:27:42 PM »
i don't like the tone of this article it offends me and comes off as harsh

Yeah, they probably lost a character just before they wrote it :(
Someone says, out of character:
     "Sorry, was a wolf outside, had to warn someone."

BUT NEERRRR IM A STEALTHY ASSASSIN HEMOTING. BUTBUTBUTBUTBUT. Shut. Up.

Harmless

  • Posts: 2782
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2013, 10:15:56 PM »
i don't like the tone of this article it offends me and comes off as harsh

Yeah, they probably lost a character just before they wrote it :(

Yeah, maybe.
Useful tips: Commands |  |Storytelling:  1  2

Kismetic

  • Posts: 7006
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2013, 02:44:14 AM »
Shut way up.  It's a game.  Don't be dumb
"Well, Gary, if that even is your real name ...  somebody stole my computer.  Now, if you're a criminal--  Look at me! ... You have to tell me, legally, or else it's considered entrapment."  -- Andy Dwyer

James de Monet

  • Posts: 3353
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #14 on: July 01, 2013, 03:07:13 PM »
i don't like the tone of this article it offends me and comes off as harsh

Really? The tone didn't bother me at all. Have you guys ever GM'ed? It's a whole new ballgame. There's not much worse as a GM than going into a carefully prepared description of a city, wide open with possibilities, and ripe for whatever, then asking your players, "So, what do you do?" Just to have them go, "Um.........." and then spend 20 minutes trying to come up with something to do because they know you want them to, but not really having any internal character motivation whatsoever.

Clearly not all these rules are applicable to Arm, but 1, 2, 6, 9, and 10 are.  1 & 2 especially.  People constantly underestimate the value of a well-timed emote. Yeah, it can get spammy if leader lady is talking and you drop 20 emotes about how you are braiding your dreads, but don't be afraid to drop flavor emotes when you're playing guard or sidekick or aide or whatever in a scene. Sometimes that stuff is extremely fun to work with for the people doing the talking, or for the other people in the scene, even boredom emotes!

Code: [Select]
>pem eyes flutter once and he rocks back on his heels, catching himself with a start and snapping his eyes back to ~leader sheepishly

>em stares blankly at the wall, carafe forgotten in ^me hands, until the wine slops over the cup's edge, producing a hiss and a muffled curse
You know I think if James simply retitled his thread "Cheese" and apologized for his first post being off-topic, all problems would be solved.

James de Monet

  • Posts: 3353
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2013, 03:29:44 PM »
I also wanted to add:

In Arm as in P-n-P, PCs and their actions give energy to the scene. The more PCs you have, and the more they are doing, the more everyone else will be energized by the scene and want to interact with it. Why do you think RPTs are so overwhelming? You put that many PCs in a room, there's so much energy that if one person emotes scratching their ass, everyone is jumping to respond.

The same is true on the opposite end of the spectrum, though. You have two PCs in a room and neither of them is emoting...you're gonna have a dead room. Two PCs both emoting a lot, though, will help each other to keep the scene moving.

And finally, solo emoting is hard for the same reason: all the energy has to come from you. You don't always have to do it, because there will always be times that you, the player, don't have the energy for it. However, a good gauge for how well-developed your character is is that you always know what they would be doing in a given situation: crowd, couple, solo. As long as you know that, you can always be ready to add to a potential scene, even if you don't want to make the spam worse (in a big crowd) or you don't currently have the energy (when solo).

That's just my eight and a half 'sid.
You know I think if James simply retitled his thread "Cheese" and apologized for his first post being off-topic, all problems would be solved.

Morrolan

  • Posts: 2760
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2013, 05:15:52 PM »
...even if you don't want to make the spam worse (in a big crowd)...

I just wanted to add that hemote is your friend for character development, and in crowded scenes.

Hidden emoting means that not everyone will see what your character does. It can be used effectively in the following ways:

To add subtle clues about what your character is thinking
Think about this from the other players' positions:

Sitting silently at the long, bone bar, the tall, muscular man watches the room.
vs.
You notice: Sitting silently at the long, bone bar, the tall, muscular man watches the room.
vs.
The tall, muscular man sits silently at the long bone bar, eyes on the room.
You notice: The tall, muscular man's eyes flicker from one group to another as conversations rise and fall.


To let you focus on telling the story of your character
When you don't even know if people will see it, emotes become much more character-driven and much less scene-drive. You might find yourself feeling less like you're a character up on stage with everyone watching, and more like you're actually a person.

To draw attention to your character
If you hemote consistently, people will see it. Eventually. And a hemote sometimes gets people to pay attention in a way that emotes don't.

To give your character depth
Hemoting can force you to examine your character's motivations on multiple levels.
  • What they think they're saying
  • What they're actually saying
  • What they think about what they're saying

The tall, muscular man says, in Midwest-accented English, "We come in peace."
You notice: The tall, muscular man's lips curl into the barest sneer and his eyes harden.


Even better, pemote allows you to write about subtle things that your character doesn't choose to do.
The tall, muscular man smiles.
vs.
The tall, muscular man smiles.
You notice: There's a hint of strain around the tall, muscular man's eyes.


To take the virtual world into account
If your character's sitting alone in a busy tavern, and he scratches his nose, chances are not everyone will notice.
You notice: The tall, muscular man scratches his nose, looking around.

Also, you can use it for environmental effects.
You notice: The tall, muscular man's hair drifts back and forth in the shifting winds beneath the pale moon.

EDIT to add:

Depending on your client, you might be able to type in multiple lines at once, and have them go off together. On my client, the character is a semicolon (though maybe I just set it that way).

Code: [Select]
em smiles at ~templar, with a dip of his head in agreement;hemote grits his teeth and sighs a little in frustration
The tall muscular man smiles at the hardnosed templar, with a dip of his head in agreement.
You notice: The tall, muscular man grits his teeth and sighs a little in frustration.


EDIT to add some more:

Just to take a step back for a moment, I'm not saying that emoting, or even hemoting, is good RP. What I am trying to say is that by focusing on hemotes that take into account the environment, the virtual world, and conflicts that occur within your character, you may find yourself developing deeper, more believable characters. Sometimes the hemote can give the illusion of depth even when it's not there. You'll see for yourself how powerful that can be!
« Last Edit: July 01, 2013, 05:36:37 PM by Morrolan »
"I have seen him show most of the attributes one expects of a noble: courtesy, kindness, and honor.  I would also say he is one of the most bloodthirsty bastards I have ever met."

Morrolan

  • Posts: 2760
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2013, 06:03:16 PM »
Move to its own topic. [/derail]
"I have seen him show most of the attributes one expects of a noble: courtesy, kindness, and honor.  I would also say he is one of the most bloodthirsty bastards I have ever met."

Maso

  • Posts: 3772
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #18 on: July 26, 2013, 10:35:58 AM »
This one really resonated with me...

Quote
Donít go off and sit in a tree, you prick!
Quote
emote pees into your eyes deeply

I don't always act superior... but when I do it's on the forums of a text-based game

Armaddict

  • Posts: 6162
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #19 on: July 26, 2013, 03:57:46 PM »
Sadly, this guide is based off of collaborative work.  Not as in collaborative story writing, like arm, but as in a bunch of players united under a direction or path.

Armageddon is more chaotic, less 'tied down', and not so built around people grouping together.  Even in groups, there is intrigue, and between groups, there is intrigue.  While some of it can be useful, the tone of it (which I didn't find harsh) is obviously far more geared for a tabletop game with parties and clearly-defined enemies and allies than a Zalanthan story.

I read it with distrust and wariness, and I remain that way.  Armageddon tends to cultivate its own brand of 'good roleplay' that makes armageddon players truly unique in every other setting they immerse themselves into.  Usually in a 'Wow' way.
She wasn't doing a thing that I could see, except standing there leaning on the balcony railing, holding the universe together. --J.D. Salinger

LauraMars

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  • Posts: 9381
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #20 on: July 26, 2013, 08:59:48 PM »
Yeah, this is clearly geared towards tabletop gaming.  There were some decent points to make about knowing your character doesn't exist in a vacuum, and embracing failure, but: "Don't harm other characters"? Seriously?  That's advice that I think is AWESOME in a tabletop setting, but applied to Armageddon it stinks.  

In a tabletop setting, if my fellow tabletopper decided to start treating my half-elf mage with discriminatory violence, I'd laugh and call him a dick and tell him to stop, because we're only here for 3 hours a week and we don't have time for that shit.  In Armageddon, if someone started treating my half-elf mage with discriminatory violence, I'd get on the request tool and send kudos before the blood had finished drying.

I agree that the conflict and intrigue of Armageddon roleplay is really unique, it's something you don't seem to find in any other setting.
Child, child, if you come to this doomed house, what is to save you?

A voice whispers, "Read the tales upon the walls."

Riev

  • Posts: 5374
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2013, 01:16:13 PM »
em mumbles something about the title of the post being about roleplaying, not specifically armplaying.
Masks are the Armageddon equivalent of Ed Hardy shirts.

BleakOne

  • Posts: 2674
Re: 11 ways to be a better roleplayer
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2013, 06:41:18 PM »
em mumbles something about the title of the post being about roleplaying, not specifically armplaying.

Now now, good sir, use whisper self so the hidden elf has a chance to hear.  ;D
Vennant doesn't appear to age because he serves drinks at the speed of light. Now you know why there's no delay on the buy code in the Gaj.