Author Topic: How to start a plot  (Read 3887 times)

Cutthroat

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How to start a plot
« on: October 31, 2010, 11:44:55 AM »
After seeing discussions about plots and particularly about the player-driven system throughout the GDB, I decided to write a little piece about things players can do to successfully start a plot. I wrote this because I wasn't personally having a great deal of trouble with the player-driven system and wanted to help those who were.

What this thread is:
  • a guide that focuses primarily on starting plots that require staff assistance/approval, but covers all kinds of plots to some extent
  • a place for players and staff to add their own ideas to eventually be incorporated into documentation for Original Submissions
  • a place to discuss the ideas players and staff mention
  • a supplementary piece to Taven's guide on getting involved in plots
  • a place for constructive criticism

What this thread is not:
  • a place for destructive criticism
  • a place to discuss the merits and/or drawbacks of the player-driven system
  • a place to comment on any perceived abundance or lack of player-driven and/or staff-assisted plots
(If you want to discuss these things, fine, but do it in a thread or forum that they've been discussed in already, please.)

One, some or all of these tips below may seem like common sense to you, in which case you are definitely qualified to add your own ideas.

Without further ado...



1: If you want a better chance of getting staff's attention, involve as many players as reasonably possible.

Perhaps the most important tip of all, it is derived from the fact that staff generally like to make the biggest possible bang with the time they have to act as storytellers and administrators. When things aren't planned out, they tend towards making the world appear more alive around wherever many players have congregated - whether a tavern is more filled with players than usual, or a large group is taking a trip outside of the cities, or what have you. It stands to reason that when a plot is planned out, that staff are going to want to affect as many people as possible too.

This tip applies particularly to players in leadership roles, as their characters have (or can obtain) the influence required to get people together for large plots like conflicts with an opposing faction(s), building projects, heists, or anything else imaginable, but it's applicable to any character with the drive and desire to do something big. As your PC begins to work with (or against) other players in other clans, you end up drawing in more staff into your plot as well, who will have a combined interest in seeing the plot come to its conclusion, likely with plenty of interesting steps along the way. The staff will be interested because their work will affect not just a scattered few but rather many players (in the case of building projects, players that are in the area are included in that to some extent).

Clans usually contain plenty of players, but don't forget about independents, either. There's usually always a way to involve them. Just think about what they can do and how that might fit into your plan.

Let's take an example: you are a dwarf from Red Storm Village with the focus to cross the Silt Sea. Let's say your dwarf is an independent for simplicity's sake. You want staff to pay attention to your dwarf because only staff knows what he will find on the other side (or if there even is an "other side"). So your dwarf does the following:
  • hires a T'zai Byn unit to come along (Byn staff are now involved)
  • offers a Salarri agent all the silt-horror shells the expedition crew obtains in exchange for a few seasoned hunters to come along (Salarr staff are now involved)
  • offers an Oash noble a full report of what is found while requesting one gemmed employee to come and help (Oash staff are now involved)
  • offers a Kuraci agent some valuable findings in exchange for a nice silt-skimmer (Kurac staff are now involved)

... you get the idea. Your plot now has an increased chance of passing now that more PCs and their staff are invested in it.

2: Consider whether your plot idea makes sense.

In the player-driven system, staff still represent the NPCs, and will make it clear to plot-starters if those NPCs support their plot. Whether they're senior members of merchant or noble houses, high-ranking templars, or military officers, their approval is generally pretty important to leader PCs. Therefore, your idea needs to make enough sense for these NPCs to support.

"Make sense" is a very broad term. What makes sense to a Byn Captain versus what makes sense to a Salarri Captain might be pretty different, because those clans have their own seperate interests, ideals, and goals. As an independent your PC might not answer to any of these people, but may have to worry about their reaction to your plan. But here are some questions you should ask about your plot-in-planning to figure out whether it will mesh well with the game.
  • Does it require assuming that something exists when it might not? You can't ask staff to load a group of escaped muls to capture unless those muls would have escaped. You can't ask staff to load a time capsule to dig out of the sand in the desert unless someone actually buried it.
  • Does it detract from or dilute the game? This is particularly for construction as well as destructive plots. Destructive plots are hard to get support for because you would be taking away the game's features, thus detracting from the game. That's not to say that destruction is impossible - just that there has to be a good reason for it. Construction plots are similarly hard because there is the danger of adding features that already exist. For example, adding a tenth tavern to a city won't necessarily make it more popular than the other nine, and might spread players apart too much.
  • Does it benefit the powers that be? In real life, it is pretty hard to start a war or build something without a good reason and the assurance that resources are already in possession or can be obtained that will cover the cost of the efforts. It isn't much different in-game. The NPCs lending you support don't want to lose out, and more often want to gain something, whether that gain is tangible (e.g., coins, resources) or intangible (e.g., support of the citizens, political clout).

3: Write thorough reports (and possibly plans).

In order to get staff support, they need to know as much about what you want as possible. Write about it, and include it in a Character Report, whether you usually write them for your character or not. If your PC can write, you have the added possibility of writing out your plans IG - while not absolutely necessary, it is the perfect way to represent the idea you are representing to your superiors, who can presumably also read, and following Point #1, makes it easier to share plans with other leaders that can read. Specifically outline what NPCs would be providing, and what staff would have to work on if they approve. If you are in doubt about whether to include something, include it.

4: Offer to write necessary rooms and objects up.

For plots which require adding or changing a room or rooms, or adding or changing an object, staff have to do the work of approving the changes and adding them, but there's no need to make them do the work of actually writing those things. Offer to write entire rooms and/or objects, following the submission guidelines, or write paragraphs to append to the descriptions of existing rooms or objects. This lessens staff workload and shows your interest in seeing this plot through.

5: Be ready to compromise.

As more players and staff get involved in your plot, things about the plot will probably change. Just be ready to adapt, and don't look at proposed changes as a slight against you, but be ready to ask and answer questions about your plot and these changes. It's pretty hard to explain this point further, but I think we're all familiar with the concept of compromising.



That's all I have for now. It's not a lot, because I'd like to see other people offer input, and I might add some later myself. Eventually I'd like to wrap it up with several good, fleshed-out tips to submit. Feel free to discuss in this thread rather than taking it to another one.

Derain

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2010, 01:17:40 PM »
I was thinking on Cutthroat's post here, he is absolutely correct but I want to touch on some things I've noticed and done wrong.

In the past I've had my characters forced into a spot that they DID not want to be. I threw a hissy fit in game and ended up ruining the fun for a few other PCs- If a huge change occurs and it really is upsetting OOC take a break for a few hours to clear your head and go back to thinking how you can get back on track with your original plot.

The only reason I suggest the break is sometimes we make bad choices without thinking about the harm we just did to Lord Fancy Pants and the Fancy Pants Conglomerate, making ourselves just look irrational.

Another thing I've noticed about making a plot work is this: People will die along the way be ready for it and have a backup plan or backup lackey, pending on the plan.

Also Staff are your friend, they will help you. This is something I didn't realize as a new player I thought they were the evil order who was out to sabotage and murder my PC, and mess up my plot at every turn to keep us on our toes. (OOPS)


Cutthroat

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2010, 10:05:28 AM »
Thanks Derain. I was hoping for more collaborative...ness from other players as well but I'll start working with what I have now to make another draft.

Derain

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2010, 05:26:59 PM »
Yeah, sorry my collaboration was mostly things I did wrong or noticed in my time playing thus far.

Derain

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2011, 08:36:23 PM »
I just wanted to add onto this, I have recently learned, that if your staff has not replied in awhile if you have a plot do not lose heart, and if you have the request tool email you a copy of the request so you can update on the fly. This is better than spamming your staff and would more than likely be appreciated by them. If you need them absolutely for the plot to go forward be patient and if they don't reply in a week or so maybe make the request again as it might have been ignored.

 Mostly I have had great reaction times from staff except on one occassion where I irrationally stored a PC I regret storing badly.

Also report report report, this is a great way to get what you want, and the staff are more likely to watch your roleplay and give feedback as well as help you when you wish up to get a plot flowing.

A habit I have found myself in also is if you end up with a huge impromptu linch mob that is going to go hang Harry the half-elf, WISH UP let the staff know. Yes that may cause an army of soldier to come down on you, but it may also make for quite a bit of immersion on the entire groups behalf. Ive turned a small outting into a great impromptu RPT just by letting the staff know what was going on when it came up spur of the moment. I hope some of this has been at least a bit informative thanks guys.

Tisiphone

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2011, 10:39:02 AM »
Suggested points:

Staff are people too:
Staff members have lives. They have families, they have work. They love this game, but their time is limited, just like that of players, or even more, considering the load of responsibility they have taken on. Keep this in mind when you want to run your plot. So sometimes, no matter how awesome and wonderful the payoff could be, your plot might not get very far ahead, simply because it requires too much work on their parts.

This isn't hard and fast: the cooler you can make the plot, the more likely it is that some staff member or cadre thereof will pick it up and run with it. Also, see above; the more people involved, the more likely staff are to help with your plot, as their work becomes worth it to touch several players instead of just one. Nevertheless, the lemma here is minimize the amount of work staff must do.

Staff play this game to have fun:
This comes directly from the above. Just like the rest of us, staff log in to Armageddon to have a good time; they don't log in because they feel like their day job isn't putting enough on their plates. Sure, they've taken on a lot of work that we haven't; I imagine that this is in large part because they derive pleasure from supporting a game they grew to love. However, they still (hopefully) enjoy the actual act of roleplaying and being in the game - just as the environment, npcs, etc. now rather than as PCs. If they can take on a role they enjoy rather than one they don't, they're much more likely to help with your plot.

(This isn't to say that all staff members like animation. I imagine some do and some don't; it seems like a lot of pressure to me.)

There are many different ways to be told no:
They all mean something different. Learn to distinguish them. Lord Hardnose Borsail throwing a hissy-fit ICly (through a report or otherwise) isn't the same as a staff member telling you, "No, we've discussed it upstairs, and your idea doesn't fit the world." Here are a few different ways I've encountered, and what they have meant in the past (examples generalized to protect the innocent):
  • "Lady Silkenbottom throws a hissyfit and forbids it" - this should be treated IC. Expect to see heavy resistance to your plot from the world, but that doesn't mean staff want you to stop. If they do, they'll tell you. This is possibly the case even when vague terms like 'elders' or 'superiors' is used.
  • "We discussed it, and we don't think we're going to go ahead with that." - This one is rare. It means your plot as it stands conflicts with something you probably can't see, and that you should not continue along those lines. It doesn't mean drop it, though; it means further communication with staff is required, to find out if you can change your idea to be appropriate.
  • "You need to wait for x,y,z" or alternatively, you noticing that the changes necessary have not been made after you've done the work - Either your staff member has a lot on his plate at present, or you haven't actually gotten all of the legwork done.

There are others. In almost all cases, it pays to communicate further with staff, rather than just throwing a fit.

Staff are people too (redux):
If you are pleasant to work with, staff will work with you. If you show that you're going to be whiny, or too needy, or accusatory, or just generally see staff's actions in a negative light, they won't like working with you, so they won't.

Prove you're worth working with:
This point of advice is mostly for long-term plots. Don't go out and needlessly risk your character out of boredom. Expect to have to prove to staff you'll be around for a while before they take on your cause; while this may not be always true, I imagine it to be pretty annoying when someone they've put a lot of hours into helping along up and dies for stupid reasons. This isn't to say you shouldn't take risks and enjoy living in a dangerous world. Just don't do it stupidly. Condensation: don't run out to kill scrab just for fun.
There is no general doctrine which is not capable of eating out our morality if unchecked by the deep-seated habit of direct fellow-feeling with individual fellow-men. -George Eliot

Cutthroat

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2011, 12:52:50 PM »
I like these points. I think communication with staff is a big issue for some players, especially those who are more hesitant to approach them with stuff, submit reports to them, or sometimes misread what is being said. It would definitely be worth including in a final version of this article.

Derain

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2011, 12:54:47 PM »
Tisiphone you said what I was trying to in a far more readable format, thank you awesome points.

Talia

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2011, 02:03:05 PM »
OK. I have some thoughts. I have done a lot of plot stuff both from player side and staff side. Plots are of big concern to me, because to point out the obvious, my job title around here is "Storyteller," not "Junior Administrative Clerk." If there aren't plots, if all I do all day long is fulfill "Join a Clan Forum" requests...then I am a sad camper, not a happy camper. In the player-driven environment, I need you guys to start stuff, so that I have stuff to help with. Right? Right!

I want to talk about what a story is and what a story is not, for a moment. A story is circumstances outside of your character which come to some sort of crisis point, which requires resolution and thus character action/response. Within the story, your character develops. A story is not your character deciding to do something and then totally succeeding with no obstacles or negative consequences. We talk a lot around here about "conflict" and how it's good for the game; but more than that, conflict/struggle/obstacles/difficulty/negative consequences are the engine of the story which is playing around your character.

Players often get flustered or angry when bad things happen to their PCs, from other PCs or the environment or the NPC superior layer. I too have had my difficulties when this happened to my PCs; however, I now look back on those adversities as some of the most fun things I ever experienced in the game. They led to character richness and depth. For the most part, my characters didn't "win" much, but, they lived very interesting lives--great stories.

So, keep that in mind as you work on plots. You will not always win; you may not even often win. But winning isn't the point, rather, constructing a great story is.

Next point...coming up with an interesting plot that can reasonably involve a number of different PCs, and which staff will be interested/willing to support, is actually a pretty difficult task. Don't underestimate the creativity required to do this. (Having been the creator/initiator of plots on the player side, and now the supporter/helper of plots on the staff side, I certainly don't underestimate what it takes to simply think of plots.)

Unfortunately, I see players tending to stick to some well-worn grooves with plot ideas and not getting much out of their comfort zones. For example:

-- Building plots, i.e., "I want to build an edifice or organization." There is nothing wrong or bad with this kind of plot, it's just been done a lot and it's an easy idea. The downfall of most building plots is that they don't attract a lot of opposition from other players, so they don't create conflict, so they aren't very exciting plots. They do take a long time to get done, but it's not because of player opposition or staff reluctance; there are just a lot of details to work out between players and players, and players and staff, (agreements, supplies, etc.), so they just...take a long time.

-- A subset of building plots: building plots that would result in new boltholes for a clan or small group of players. This is the private fortress in the sand, or new trade outpost, or private tavern only for X group, or whatever kind of thing. Staff aren't very interested in supporting plots and projects that will further separate the playerbase.

-- > kill man. This is a time-honored tradition of Armageddon plots, but for the most part it's not very long-term interesting. Sometimes it does spawn other plot stuff, but sometimes it kills plots dead. It's sort of a toss-up.

-- Stuff related to the "end of the world" plots. It's been openly stated by staff that we're not pursuing the end of the world plots anymore. But, players seem to want to keep pursuing stuff that they perceive as related to the end of the world. Pro-tip: If staff has publicly OOCly stated "we are not doing this," then attempting to make it happen is going to be fruitless and frustrating.

-- Other stuff that is ultra-high-magick or non-mundane. This goes hand in hand with the end of the world stuff. I think it's a recognized problem that high-magick plots tend to leave out a significant portion of the playerbase (everyone not playing a magicker or templar or psionicist)--well, except as target practice ;) When players attempt to pursue plots that are high-magick, we as staff need to weigh that against the probability that many other players will be deliberately left out of such pursuits. I get that many players are really attracted to high-magick stuff, and I get that's why players often want to pursue it, but, from the perspective of staff it may not be worth helping out with.

-- Interpersonal plots. Amos loves Malik loves Talia loves Amos. Again, there is nothing wrong or bad with this type of plot. But, when it is all that is happening, Armageddon feels less epic than it could. This is a comfortable and familiar type of plot; it's awesome when players shake this kind of thing up with "now that I have their loyalty and love, I am going to totally use them and screw them over in the following ways."

-- "Let's have a war!" There's nothing wrong with this idea, but, it's a really easy idea. And most players don't have the patience or skill to see it from beginning to end.

I think that hits the major types of plots that players consistently pursue.

Stuff I don't often see players doing:

-- Anything truly political. There's so much room in both city-states for politics to happen, but players just don't seem to take it up.

-- Plots related to the real function or business of their clan. Develop a new line of X for sale; undercut a competitor's business in a long-term and strategic manner; destroy a business/political enemy without killing them or their minions; hosting business/political functions; and so much more.

-- Simply throwing RPTs, when they can't think of other things to do. RPTs aren't really that hard to throw together, and clan staff are happy to help make these happen--assuming you coordinate with us. (It's harder to support what you're doing when you don't plan it for a time we can attend, and/or don't tell us what it is you want.) Sometimes RPTs help move plots along, or become the seeds of plots.

Another thing that players often misunderestimate is the quantity of patience and perseverance that are required to see any plot through. You know that plot thing that you think should take you about one real-life month to accomplish? Go ahead and multiply that by six, or even twelve...and you may be coming close. Again, a lot of this has to do with just the fact of needing to coordinate stuff from player to player, and between players and staff. It doesn't mean anything is "broken" or that anyone is trying to screw with you. Take it as an opportunity to remember that the plot is in the journey, not in the arrival.

Final thought, I think...if you can't think of any interesting plots to pursue, you're welcome to ask your clan staff for input. Now, a caveat: They are just people too. They may or may not have any more interesting ideas than the ones you've already mustered up. Thinking up interesting and engaging plots is hard. I know that I am always willing to throw some ideas out to my clannies for what they can be doing. That being said, if you ask me for ideas and then I give you my best ideas and then you still don't do anything...well, that's disappointing. I'm working really hard to help you and support you, but, you've gotta do some of the work, too!

OK, actual final thought...the recent popularity of Skyrim amongst our playerbase has made me look at how much fun it seems to be for players when quests get handed to them, and they can choose to accept or not. Yes, getting quests can be really fun. In Armageddon we don't have quest-givers; you guys are the quest-givers. It's a lot of work to do, but someone's got to be doing it, or nothing happens. If every player was actively initiating and pursuing and involving other players in one bigger quest/plot, what would that look like, I wonder?
Character: "I've been working on building a new barracks for some tim-"
NPC: "Yeah, that fell through, sucks but YOUR HOUSE IS ON FIREEE!! FIRE-KANKS!!

lordcooper

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2011, 03:05:31 PM »
-- Anything truly political. There's so much room in both city-states for politics to happen, but players just don't seem to take it up.

This is probably a failing on my part, (I've never actually had a PC with any interest in politics whatsoever) but I'm having a bit of difficulty in seeing how anything purely political (and not culminating in a simple assassination) can be accomplished by PCs, given the glass ceiling and general player count.  Could you toss out a couple of really basic examples of the kind of plot you're talking about here?
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Cind

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2011, 03:21:49 PM »
Vnpcs are gold for me. They're excellent props who are extensions of my own story--- and they don't have a 60% chance of dying by next week.

On starting a plot--- I love involving vnpcs I made up, for more than just background (basically not just to verify that, in fact, biological parents had a role in your existence at some point.) I prefer making them statistical (my three sisters are not all psionicists) although I'm come across several statistically imbalanced plotlines that were really quite intriguing and I wish I could have learned more about their plots.

 I like trying to think like a real world person---- how many people are in my own life, personally, and what it is like to be them? One person in my own life has a cultural inferiority complex and another is a domineering, rude person who is in constant denial. Another I was never really close with must have been the kindest and nicest person I've ever known, who came from a bad background and would need quite a bit of help or to put a lot of effort into getting anywhere, monetarily and success-wise.

Thinking like this tends to give me fuller and deeper characters and vnpc relatives, friends and enemies than I could make up by myself without reference.

Even if my plot is weaksauce---- and my tendency to violently veer away from playing similiar characters back to back, as well as my love of more realistic plots, ensures I get weaksauce constantly--- I love weaksauce plots, by the way, I love being normal--- the characters in the plot usually more than make up for whatever shitty character I'm slinging off the Shield Wall of my mind. Its a foolproof plan, too---- unless you're a particularly strange breed or you're insane and have rocks for friends, you're bound to have at least one person of note in your life by the time you start playing, dead or alive.

Reading about the building new organization/taverns/meeting place.... is it just me, or are less people playing now than, say, a few months ago? If there are less people, I think it would be easier for destroy-the-third-tavern plots to kick and even get a tavern board rumor in their honor or succeed. Just an idea. I think that would be beneficial to the game world, honestly. There's also some sort of Arena-like structure in Tuluk which allows only true-inked in for RPTs, despite the fact that its not even a post-war time period. Bringing together the playerbase more, under sensible circumstances, means more chances to find people who are willing to be a part of and interested in your plot. I totally support this.

-- Anything truly political. There's so much room in both city-states for politics to happen, but players just don't seem to take it up.

This is probably a failing on my part, (I've never actually had a PC with any interest in politics whatsoever) but I'm having a bit of difficulty in seeing how anything purely political (and not culminating in a simple assassination) can be accomplished by PCs, given the glass ceiling and general player count.  Could you toss out a couple of really basic examples of the kind of plot you're talking about here?

I'm interested too. I wouldn't mind throwing a moderately heretical commoner pc on the political chopping block if it meant RP fun for everyone for longer than three real-life days.
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Talia

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2011, 03:29:14 PM »
-- Anything truly political. There's so much room in both city-states for politics to happen, but players just don't seem to take it up.

This is probably a failing on my part, (I've never actually had a PC with any interest in politics whatsoever) but I'm having a bit of difficulty in seeing how anything purely political (and not culminating in a simple assassination) can be accomplished by PCs, given the glass ceiling and general player count.  Could you toss out a couple of really basic examples of the kind of plot you're talking about here?

You're playing a noble from House Wysiwyg. You're annoyed that your House ranks 5 out of 6 in your city-state, and you realize that if you're instrumental in getting your House bumped from 5 to 4 or higher, you'll be rewarded and maybe even promoted. You plot to get this done. (This has happened more than once in the past few years.)

Alternately: You hate House Qwerty. You want to make them suffer and pay. You plot to make them drop in rank. You know your House will also love you for this, because everyone else hates Qwerty too, for reasons justifiable or habitual.

You're playing a noble from House Gryffindor. There's an organization that might compete with yours over the employment of Quidditch Mages. You conceive a plot to get the other organization disbanded, so that only your House can employ them. (Something sort of like this happened within the past few years.)

You're playing a dude from House Anyhouse. You go to the Senate or the Triumvirate to get Benefit for your House, and/or to screw over some other organization.

I wouldn't mind throwing a moderately heretical commoner pc on the political chopping block if it meant RP fun for everyone for longer than three real-life days.

I wouldn't call that politics. Politics involves getting advantages or creating disadvantages, and jockeying for position, of organizations. That may or may not involve PCs doing bold public things. It definitely involves behind-doors deal-making, mutual back-rubbing, political backstabbing, possibly coded backstabbing, etc.
Character: "I've been working on building a new barracks for some tim-"
NPC: "Yeah, that fell through, sucks but YOUR HOUSE IS ON FIREEE!! FIRE-KANKS!!

Derain

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2011, 08:08:49 PM »
Talia I want to thank you for your imput and it opened my eyes I hadn't looked at a few of the options you mentioned there.. Hmm Thank you.

Also Thank the rest of you for jumping in on this and I hope it helps wit hCutthroats article.

Talia

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Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2011, 03:31:14 PM »
Here is an example taken from an episode of the TV series Glee. If you haven't watched all/most of season 2 of Glee and plan to at some point, there are spoilers below. If you're never gonna watch Glee or you've already seen this, then carry on. This is a really superb example of a political plot, started from a personal level. I could see a plot of this type being highly achievable for a politically-inclined PC in Armageddon.

Santana loves Brittany. Brittany is dating Artie and refuses to break up with him (and break his heart), although she loves Santana in return. Brittany is a basically good person.

Santana is determined to get Brittany for her own. So she hatches a conniving plan.

Santana fixes on the idea that if she becomes Prom Queen, then she can royally decree that Brittany must leave Artie for an exclusive relationship with her (because Brittany is dumb and will believe she must obey).

In order to get voted in as Prom Queen, Santana needs a suitable Prom King, someone who can also bring in plenty of votes due to alpha-male status within the high school social environment.

Santana approaches Karofsky (an alpha male football player at the top of the social hierarchy), who she knows to be gay, and extorts him into joining her Prom effort by threatening to release this knowledge to the school--which he desperately wants to avoid. The two of them, being gay but not wanting anyone to know due to the social disapprobation they would receive, will pretend to date and be one another's beards and thus continue to remain socially acceptable.

Additionally, Santana demands that Karofsky make amends for previous bullying to Kurt so that Kurt can return to the school and re-join the Glee Club, because Santana knows that if she can facilitate Kurt's return that will help the Glee Club's chances at the National competition, and thus gain her the votes of the other Glee Clubbers for Prom Queen. (Prom Queen votes from the Glee Club would otherwise be divided between Santana, and Quinn and Lauren who are also in Glee Club, if Santana did not move to prevent this.)

This is an intensely political plot which stems from one fundamental human objective: Acquire mate for exclusive use. Along the way, there is spywork, planning, extortion, threatening, coercion, manipulation, jockeying for position, blatant use of other people, knowing the weaknesses of your enemies and pawns, and self-interest masquerading as charitable action.

Santana doesn't really care about being Prom Queen, but she does care intensely about getting Brittany for herself; and she doesn't care who she needs to use or screw over (including Brittany) to do it.

P.S. I HAVEN'T WATCHED THE CONCLUSION OF THIS PLOT YET SO DON'T RUIN IT FOR ME PLZ.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2011, 03:38:55 PM by Talia »
Character: "I've been working on building a new barracks for some tim-"
NPC: "Yeah, that fell through, sucks but YOUR HOUSE IS ON FIREEE!! FIRE-KANKS!!

Karieith

  • Posts: 784
Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2012, 06:12:57 PM »
Is there a place for silly?

A hypothetical: Lord Caligula Borsail is so eccentric. Did you hear he's stripping down his slaves and having them run naked through the streets with double-bladed scissors? They say the first one to make it out the front gates gets their freedom.

There's no real build up to this plot, it's just random impulsive silly fun. Is there a place for this? Does this kind of stuff get a lot of support? Is it viewed positively?
If indeed you really want to help the poor, vote democratic.

Sajoi

  • Posts: 214
Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2012, 06:09:55 AM »
Is there a place for silly?

A hypothetical: Lord Caligula Borsail is so eccentric. Did you hear he's stripping down his slaves and having them run naked through the streets with double-bladed scissors? They say the first one to make it out the front gates gets their freedom.

There's no real build up to this plot, it's just random impulsive silly fun. Is there a place for this? Does this kind of stuff get a lot of support? Is it viewed positively?

This would be hilarious to see happen in the game!
+2
At your table, the bulky, olive-skinned woman says in sirihish, bluntly:
         "You sound like you're about to orgasm or bein' tickled to death when you talk. Just.. be calm. Breathe."

Cind

  • Posts: 1206
Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2012, 12:51:11 AM »
Is there a place for silly?

A hypothetical: Lord Caligula Borsail is so eccentric. Did you hear he's stripping down his slaves and having them run naked through the streets with double-bladed scissors? They say the first one to make it out the front gates gets their freedom.

There's no real build up to this plot, it's just random impulsive silly fun. Is there a place for this? Does this kind of stuff get a lot of support? Is it viewed positively?

This would be hilarious to see happen in the game!
+2

Nobles get away (in the south anyway) with regularly and openly hiring 'gickers. Therefore, my ignorant dirtbrain commoner assumes they can get away with anything.

Or, you know, whatever the political and social climate is for nobles. Nobles, can you do this? For yourselves and for the world?
Look, a petting tregil.  So silky...Feel him.

roobee

  • Posts: 145
Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2016, 07:29:31 PM »
Most of these ideas seem to be for leaders, wealthy people, or generally powerful people in some way. What if your a regular Amos with a clan leader that isn't great at making plots? How about ideas for how he can start a plot?

Lizzie

  • Posts: 7311
Re: How to start a plot
« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2016, 09:03:48 PM »
Most of these ideas seem to be for leaders, wealthy people, or generally powerful people in some way. What if your a regular Amos with a clan leader that isn't great at making plots? How about ideas for how he can start a plot?

As a member of a clan with someone else as a leader, it's not quite as easy to create a plot - than if you were either the leader of a clan, or a "trusted promoted person" in the clan with some authority/recognition. It's also not quite as easy as if you were an independent.

But there are lots of little things you can do as a low-ranking clan member. You could suggest things to your clan leader and let him run with it and involve you as his "right arm" for the project. You could become a turncoat and betray him to an adversary. You could pretend to be an antagonist, but secretly be on the boss's side, and ferret out the real troublemakers in the clan. You could behave like an independent and stir up all kinds of shit, and accept that they might get you killed by your clan leader, or kicked out of the clan.

I wouldn't get into specifics of ideas here, because then everyone would know them and it'd kinda be a "spoiler" if you thought any of them were actually useful and wanted to do them.
Talia said: Notice to all: Do not mess with Lizzie's GDB. She will cut you.
Delirium said: Notice to all: do not mess with Lizzie's soap. She will cut you.