Author Topic: Tribals - Elves  (Read 1381 times)

Nineveh

  • Posts: 105
Tribals - Elves
« on: December 31, 2002, 08:59:24 PM »
I know we had a discussion on here describing elves, but I have some questions about d-elves, tribally active ones in particular.

What would be daily thoughts of elves? I would suspect they'd be more normal daily activities, revolving around keeping members and the children of the tribe safe, food and hunting for said food, aquiring the meager amount of money or items for barter required for non-craftable items that the tribe might need.

But outside of daily everyday "mundane" thoughts, what would a d-elf think about? How strong is the tribe-bond to other tribemates? Would they always have the tribe on their mind or would it be an automatic thing.. sort of like instead of obsessing about whether going out to hunt X alone would somehow pose a dilemma to the tribe (just an example) It would just be an automatic reflex to go or -not- go.

Also, how deep is the "letting go" around tribesmates? While most tribals would be wary or aloof around elves that were not part of the tribe, how relaxed are they around their tribemates? Is it safe to assume that in a very communal setting, such as most around tribes (you have a larger amount of pcs/npcs/vnpcs crammed into a relatively small area), that there would be little to no privacy and so outside customs of propriety would be loose or non-existant? Would tribemembers tend to be more affectionate/protective of each other even to their own personal loss? Without getting into specifics, how would a situation like this be handled:

Tribemate X gets into an uncomfortable situation in which while there's little physical threat, they are effectively immobalized without the help of Tribemate Y. Would tribemate Y automatically try to help X, even if there is a chance they might also be put in the position or would Y try not to since the inconveniencing of both X and Y would hurt the integrity of the tribe more than just if X was?

Would something like that even pose a dilemma to Y or would Y simply, automatically come to X's assistance (or not)?

Also, how deep is the sense of identity over the tribe identity? It's certainly not to the extreme of how mantises are described, but how ingrained is the tribal bond and the need to bond with tribemates?

What's your opinion?
se K.Y. jelly to grease up your chihauha and set him loose in the sewers to establish a beachhead for your underground empire.

the halfling

  • Posts: 90
Tribals - Elves
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2003, 04:32:03 AM »
Quote
Also, how deep is the "letting go" around tribesmates? While most tribals would be wary or aloof around elves that were not part of the tribe, how relaxed are they around their tribemates? Is it safe to assume that in a very communal setting, such as most around tribes (you have a larger amount of pcs/npcs/vnpcs crammed into a relatively small area), that there would be little to no privacy and so outside customs of propriety would be loose or non-existant? Would tribemembers tend to be more affectionate/protective of each other even to their own personal loss? Without getting into specifics, how would a situation like this be handled:


I think it would depend on the tribe(mostly based on size), but
My opinion is that most tribes would be very close.
Try to picture yourself in their shoes.
They live in a harsh place, where banding together is the -only- way they can continue living.  Death is something that is following them constantly, that little squabbles, like not getting that hide from the creature they just killed even though they did all the work, would just be insiginificant in the big picture.  The fact that at any moment they you can die, they would cherish every elf in the tribe because of this.  It isn't that I don't think elves in a tribe wouldn't disagree, but these disagreements would be quickly resolved and possibly laughed about later.

The fact that you can truly trust a tribe mate, is worth more then anything else in the world.  Greed or ambition(in my opinion are human qualities not elven ones) I think are something in the back of the minds of an elf when it comes to their tribe.  They have something that in a harsh world is worth far more then anything the richest person can give.  Someone who will be there when things are at there worse.  I think this is the reason that an elf can say they are superior with a straight face, this ability to understand that someone you can completly trust is worth more then anything.

Quote
Tribemate X gets into an uncomfortable situation in which while there's little physical threat, they are effectively immobalized without the help of Tribemate Y. Would tribemate Y automatically try to help X, even if there is a chance they might also be put in the position or would Y try not to since the inconveniencing of both X and Y would hurt the integrity of the tribe more than just if X was?

Well again I think this depends on the tribe.
I think it depends on a factor that should be defined in a tribe on an OOC level.
Is the tribe as strong as the weakest link,
or are weak links cut off?
It could be somewhere in the middle.  I think this would be something that would be pretty black and white(in that every elf in the tribe knows the cut off line) but varying from tribe to tribe.  This trust knowing that if you are in trouble, even if it is a mistake on your part that the tribe will come to save you, is something that gives this sense of worth.   A tribe I think would also try as a whole to stop this from happening from the beginning, weak links would be made stronger.
Though a more "harsh" elven tribe might just expect you to not do stupid things that get the tribe in danger, that if you make a mistake that will cause the tribe danger if they try to correct it, that elf has to accept his death.

Quote

Also, how deep is the sense of identity over the tribe identity? It's certainly not to the extreme of how mantises are described, but how ingrained is the tribal bond and the need to bond with tribemates?

I think elves in the tribe would be diffrent, and diffrences cause disagreements(another thing every tribe would handle diffrently), but also cause enjoyment in learning about other tribemates.  I think what is important as well to help this along is deciding what your tribe does for fun, when they aren't hunting or traiding or whatnot.  Tribal elves have culture to them, they tell stories, even in a harsh world there are times when they just sit back and relax(though their idea of relax can be completly diffrent then ours)
They can have games, music, stories, rituals.  Even though they might not be as advanced as say in a city, Tan Murak, or Anylai, these things in my opinion would be apart of -any- elven tribe.   Even in a strong warrior elven tribe, they still would have games and stuff, they would just be very similiar to their lifestyle(harsh games ;)  

The tribe bond is something that starts to grow at day one in an elves life.  They aren't born with it, but grow to have it, they learn it through the culture of the tribe. (though because elves are not humans, it is possible that some of this is because they are born with it)

By making the culture of your tribe more fleshed out, it allows players to be able to make personalities and quirks easier.  Also allowing you to answer these questions, since I think most of them depend on the tribe.  A strong written-out culture is in my opinion what makes or breaks a tribe in the OOC level.  Just like any background for any character, it gives the character life before you even start playing them.
 don't eat everyone.

Swordsman

  • Posts: 174
My take
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2003, 08:12:56 PM »
I think the amount of trust in a desert elf tribe would be very, very high. You would never see a d. elf backstabbing a tribemate (either literally or figuratively) in front of outsiders, IMO, but within the tribe you'd probably get a fair bit of competition for power and friendly rivalry. But then again d. elf tribes could be very different from each other, it'd come down to each individual tribe. I think the amount of bond would be such that you'd very rarely see a tribe execute one of its criminals, rather they'd banish him/her instead. All IMO.

Swordsman

Angela Christine

  • Posts: 6595
What is a Tribe?
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2003, 08:19:39 PM »
I think it depends on how you think of a tribe, and how large they are.  

If your tribe is less than 100 people, it would probably be better to think of them as a "family".  In a group this small there would likely be less than 10 kids in your age group growing up, so you would know them very well.  Everyone in the tribe would be a fairly close relative of yours.

Even in a larger tribe of a few thousand, it would be like living in a small town or village that you have lived in your whole life (in fact your family has lived there, and no "new" families have moved in, for centuries).  You would know every single member of the tribe at least slightly, and would be a blood relation to nearly everyone.  It might be a distant relation, like a third cousin, but you could trace it.  By knowing them slightly I mean that you would be able to identify them by sight and know who their parents, syblings, grandparents and children are.  This may seem absurd to modern mobile city dwellers, but if you've ever lived in a small, insular community it makes perfect sense; even if they have never met you before as soon as they find out you are ol' Ralph's grandaughter they are able to place you within the community.  

It's like the Hatfields and McCoys, the Montigues and Capulets, or the Bloods and the Crips.  Even if you go off on your own the fact that you are a member of tribe X will be recognised and taken into account both by members of your own tribe and everyone that has ever dealt with your tribe.  If your tribe has been banned from a town for raiding (or whatever) you will be arrested if you enter that town even if you've never done any raiding.  Likewise whatever you do will reflect on all the members of your tribe, for good or ill.  If you kill a member of Tribe Y, then Tribe Y may declare bloodfued on all of your Tribe, not just you personally.  If you repeatedly make trouble in a town not only will you be banned from the town, but your poor old Mother may not be able to go into that town to trade either.  You bastard.   8)  So if you are going to go off on your own and make trouble your tribe wouldn't approve of, make sure you go far, far away from your tribe's regular territory and trading partners.  The gate guards in a huge city like Allanak probably won't recognise your tribal markings (or even have heard of your piddling little tribe) but the gate guards in a small trading post like Luir's Outpost probably will if your tribe visits there regularily.  

In some tribal societies they have no word for "cousin", you call your cousins your brothers and sisters and treat them as you would treat your own syblings.  The extreme of this is the inuit (eskimos) who call all their relatives in thier own generation brother or sister (except their spouse), call everyone in their parents generation mother or father, and so on.  They simply don't have words for "aunt" "cousin" "nephew" and so on.

Like small towns, small tribes don't usually have much privacy.  Everyone knows pretty much everything about everyone else's buisness.  It's hard to keep secrets, nearly impossible in an elven tribe where practically everyone is sneaky.   :P  You probably live in tents, not sturdy buildings, and anyone passing near a tent can hear what goes on inside.  You don't have to "let down your guard" around your tribe, because it's pretty hard to raise a significant guard in a close knit tribe to begin with.

AC
Treat the other man's faith gently; it is all he has to believe with."     Henry S. Haskins