Author Topic: Gardening/Horticulture/Agriculture Thread  (Read 8953 times)

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #25 on: April 21, 2017, 01:50:31 AM »
That is a great start on fruit trees you have going. Are they all bearing fruit?

I have a section of land, probably a solid quarter-acre, which is clear, flat, open to sunlight, and fertile. The only issue is a huge boulder of limestone in the ground right in the middle. I am planning on renting an earth-mover and digging it up. Maybe grabbing some other boulders from around my property and outside to make a rock fence around my lawn.

Once the land is ready, I think I will do plot of the three-sisters, though I should be starting that right now, so it will probably happen next year.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #26 on: April 21, 2017, 08:59:41 AM »
Not yet, they're all babies I put in this year.  The apples I planted last year but then we had that terrible drought where the mountains were burning, you'll remember.  Right after I put them in the ground!  And we were not there to care for the newly planted trees.  So when I showed up this spring, I was sure they would be dead.  But two of them had a few leaves, and one had leaf buds.  Red Delicious, Granny Smith, and Honeycrisp.

How big is it?  Man.  Our farm when I was a kid, limestone is what we grew best.  We'd drive the tractor along in the fields, pulling a hay wagon.  And load it up with stones.  Clear the fields.  And in two or three years we'd have to do it again.  I never could figure out where they were coming from.  In the low lands our farm stretched for a mile along a creek, so that could explain the ones down there, but up high on the hills?  Frost heave I guess.

There's such a thing as dynamite you know.

That was my plan too, as I saw the year dwindling down, to plant a three sisters patch, but now I'm thinking I won't even do that since I've not even broken ground and I still have so much to do before winter.  Wiring, plumbing, insulation.  Gotta get a barn in, buy a cow, get the hives going, butcher a bunch of bunnies and chickens....








boog

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #27 on: April 21, 2017, 09:07:22 AM »
Whenever I get enough land to plant, I wanna plant an apple orchard with trees from Trees of Antiquity. They have a ton of heirloom varieties. I'm pretty sure one of the trees' lineage dates back to the 1300s. Maybe it was later than that. I should look again - it's been a while.

Edit: Oh, good, I'm not a lunatic:

http://www.treesofantiquity.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=145
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 09:12:33 AM by boog »
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Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #28 on: April 21, 2017, 09:50:33 AM »
Once all those apples of yours start producing, you'll have more deer coming through than you know what to do with. :D
Such a great perk of having an orchard.
Im working on turning about 4 acres of my 5 into orchard, and maybe half an acre into gardens. Hopefully, in the near future, I can buy up the woods around me and expand my orchard.

Sounds like the frost was pulling stones to the surface. I saw that happen in the Sierra Moutains in California.
I think the boulder is about 5x5x? because I have never dug under it. If it turned out to be bigger, I'd probably just spend a few days with a sledge, pickaxe, and a wheel-barrow, getting a decent work-out in.

Holy hell. I would definitely call an apple cultivar dating back nearly a millennium to be "heirloom." xD


I scattered a line of sunflower seeds in front of my house, on either side of my porch. Fingers crossed.

Oh, anyone wanna help me identify this tree?



Never saw these down south or out west. North Florida is fairly new territory for me. Boog, you're in the carolinas, right? Anything like this, near you?
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #29 on: April 21, 2017, 10:32:16 AM »
I like that tree nursery site!  I might get a couple from there for my orchard.

Deer!  We already have deer, they come all night to drink at our pond.  Right through the cabin yard.  My cousin owns a big deer preserve and rehab center that is all around us.  I love seeing them but they are getting to pest level around there.  A neighbor had half her soybeans eaten last year, many acres worth.

I don't think we will have any trouble keeping our freezer full.

Man, it kinda looks like walnut but kinda not.  Can you take a better picture of the leaves?  Showing how they are arranged, etc.



boog

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #30 on: April 21, 2017, 11:41:48 AM »
Yeah, pick a leaf or two off and get them in single shots.
Case: he's more likely to shoot up a mcdonalds for selling secret obama sauce on its big macs
Kismet: didn't see you in GQ homey
BadSkeelz: Whatever you say, Kim Jong Boog
Quote from: Tuannon
There is only one boog.

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #31 on: April 21, 2017, 12:04:11 PM »


Leaves are staggered on the twig, not in pairs. Veins branch from the central line on the leaf. Edges seem both serrated and smooth? Idk. Also, I dont remember these trees blooming/fruiting in the last year, though I may have just not noticed.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

manipura

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #32 on: April 21, 2017, 12:40:13 PM »
Before you took that little twig:


or

Refugee

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #33 on: April 21, 2017, 12:41:54 PM »
I dunno, it still looks like a walnut, but walnut bark is always much rougher unless it's a very young tree.

Maybe in Florida walnuts are different than in Kentucky.

manipura

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #34 on: April 21, 2017, 12:50:01 PM »
Could be a different type of walnut tree, but aren't walnut leaves usually a little longer and narrower than those? 
...I have no idea how many different kinds of walnut trees there are, maybe there's a dozen different leaves in the Florida area.

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #35 on: April 21, 2017, 01:02:02 PM »
@ manipura, it couldnt be those, because the leaves are staggered, not in pairs.

I dont think it is a walnut. The only nuts I have found on my property are acorns, sweetgum spiky-balls, and mockernut hickories.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1499
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #36 on: April 21, 2017, 01:09:31 PM »
Walnuts take two years to make a nut if I remember right.  They bloom one year and fruit the next.  I don't know if that helps you any.




manipura

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #37 on: April 21, 2017, 01:33:00 PM »
I didn't mean to imply that the leaves looked like the ones in the pictures...I was referring more to the arrangement of the twigs, if that makes any sense...meaning, was the twig you took a single twig, like the bottom picture?  Or several twigs extending from a central twig, like the top picture?
I'm probably not explaining it well.

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #38 on: April 21, 2017, 01:36:08 PM »
Oh, these trees are at least 20 years old, Refugee. Around 25 feet tall.

Ahhh I gotcha, manipura. They are like the first one, then.

Did a few hours of carving today, if y'all are interested. (Kinda relevant, as I took the wood from trees on/near my property.)

Broke out the table-saw to establish the near-final belly to work with. Worked with my draw-knife to start taking off mass, finding the right growth-ring on the cedar to be the back of the bow, and start establishing the back of the bow on the sweetgum (which does not have the same discernible growth rings.)

Sweetgum shortbow on the left. Just shy of 5 feet. Slight snake in the grain, which lines-up straight right now. A few pinhole knots which shouldnt cause problems.

Juniper on the right.  7 damned feet long. Huge knots, very common for juniper. I will have to work around them, and compensate for their weakness with extra wood to make sure they dont break. If I can pull it off, with a fiberglass backing, it will be a badass, character longbow.

The bellies.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 02:45:14 PM by Melkor »
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1499
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #39 on: April 21, 2017, 03:02:40 PM »
No no, I mean, they make nuts every two years.  First year they bloom, next year they make nuts.  And so on repeating the pattern.

Eastern cedar is a pretty wood, isn't it?  And it smells so fine too.

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #40 on: April 21, 2017, 03:11:01 PM »
oh! Well that would be awesome if I have some walnuts growing.

Yes, ERC has gorgeous heartwood. I am excited to have a longbow of that purple/red wood, as long as I dont break it.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1499
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #41 on: April 21, 2017, 03:20:37 PM »
When I was a kid, there was this guy who made bows for his kids to use.  We had great fun with them and they were pretty powerful.  He used hickory.  He would cut a stave and let it season for a year, and then carve it into the right shape.  I don't remember what he used for a string.

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #42 on: April 21, 2017, 03:41:12 PM »
Hickory is a fantastic bow-wood - one of the best - at around 3/4 the density of water. So hard to break a hickory bow. I considered taking down the mockernut hickory I have in the woods near-by.. but there are only one or two of them, so I decided not to. I have a few staves curing in my shed. Oak and Sweetgum. I am green-carving the ERC because I was eager to get started on another bow, along with the sweetgum I am working on.

Strings can be natural or synthetic. Oiled/waxed hemp or jute is fine for a bow up to about 50lbs, which is heavier than most children could pull. Anything heavier, you need a great sinew string, or synthetic, like dacron, which is best, honestly.

You and your friends were lucky to have a bowyer around. They are few and far between. I had child's bows when I was young, and made little stickbows and bundle-bows all the time, but my first real bow, I bought at this convenience store/bait shop/restaurant by our lake. An Indian flat-bow, probably about 10-15 years old when I bought it in 98. Broke before I left california in 2000. Old age, bad storage. When I moved to Florida, I asked for a compound bow to hunt with. I used a compound bow until I was about 20, when I switched to traditional. Never going back.

Speaking of bow-woods, though... Do you have any bois-d'arc aka Orange Osage in your area?
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

whitt

  • Posts: 1627
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #43 on: April 21, 2017, 03:49:10 PM »
Leaves are staggered on the twig, not in pairs. Veins branch from the central line on the leaf. Edges seem both serrated and smooth? Idk. Also, I dont remember these trees blooming/fruiting in the last year, though I may have just not noticed.

Maybe flowering dogwood?  It would bloom very soon if so.
Quote from: BadSkeelz
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boog

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #44 on: April 21, 2017, 04:02:14 PM »
Melkor:I thought at first the tree was a black walnut, but the Arbor Day website suggests a Kentucky Coffeetree, from what I can ascertain from the photos. I don't think that's right, looking at the leaves, because the KC's leaves are too flat and veiny. I'll keep digging.



My pears still have no blooms. Sigh. Year 3. Maybe next year.

Please excuse the shoddy landscaping. My mother bought the house after its previous owner, an elderly woman, died, and my mother has a black thumb. I stuck the trees in the front yard so they got the most amount of sun they could. It's where I'll be sticking the blueberries, too -- today was too hot! I'm gonna do THE BIG MOVE on Monday.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 04:58:35 PM by boog »
Case: he's more likely to shoot up a mcdonalds for selling secret obama sauce on its big macs
Kismet: didn't see you in GQ homey
BadSkeelz: Whatever you say, Kim Jong Boog
Quote from: Tuannon
There is only one boog.

Refugee

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #45 on: April 21, 2017, 04:52:39 PM »
It doesn't look like dogwoods I know, but there are lots of different kinds so maybe.

I had to look up that orange osage.  We do have them but they're not common.  We call them hedge apples.  I've actually never seen the plant, but I've seen the fruit handed around as an oddity someone found in the woods.

I don't think Hawk was a bowyer exactly.  Hill men of my father's generation just knew how to do everything.  They could build a house from scratch, chimney and all, grow anything, give a cow a c-section, rebuild a tractor engine, train a mule, anything that was necessary.  They never had money to pay anyone to do it for them so they did it themselves.  I'm still in contact with one of his kids, I'm going to ask what he used for the bowstring.

boog

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #46 on: April 21, 2017, 06:15:22 PM »
I'm watching this Youtuber garden and he's hooting, "Oh shit," and cutting his harvest randomly with a huge knife in the middle of his garden.

Surely, I can also have a successful YouTube channel while hooting, "Oh shit," and being way cuter.
Case: he's more likely to shoot up a mcdonalds for selling secret obama sauce on its big macs
Kismet: didn't see you in GQ homey
BadSkeelz: Whatever you say, Kim Jong Boog
Quote from: Tuannon
There is only one boog.

Refugee

  • Posts: 1499
Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #47 on: April 21, 2017, 06:28:20 PM »
Hahaha!

Melkor

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Re: Gardening/Horticulture/Landscaping Thread
« Reply #48 on: April 21, 2017, 07:36:24 PM »
Boog. I appreciate the research. The bark is much smoother than the KC, and the leaves are staggered, unlike the Black Walnut.
Hey, i like your landscaping. Better than mine. I just shove plants in the dirt wherever I know they'll have sun, shade, soil, and water, lol. That pear on the right has a nice thick trunk. Are you going to top them when they get to roof-height? You could keep them pruned short so they grow outwards, or just let them grow naturally and extend over the house. A little extra shade on your roof helps with the AC bill in the summer.

Hrmmm, I don't think it is a dogwood, either. We have them down here, and I'd like to grow them near the entrance to my driveway. So pretty when they are in bloom. I dont have any yet, though.

They burn Orange Osages in Texas because horses can get sick from the fruit. It happens to be a revered bow-wood, among the 3 best in the world. The other two are Snakewood/Soldierwood, found in jungles of the Caribbean, and supposedly south florida (I doubt it. I spent so much time in swamps, savannas, and woods in south florida and never saw anything like it, other than certain eucalyptus which look similar); and various species of Mangrove... which are so damned illegal to cut. Fines and Jail-time, unless you have them on your own property. All 3 of these woods are more dense than water, so they sink when thrown in water.
I was always tempted to take a stave of mangrove from down south, but the legal ramifications are way too great to risk. Also, the mangroves are so important to wildlife.

Men like that are all but extinct, these days. A strenuous life has taught me a lot of useful things, and I consider myself a jack of all trades, but it will be some years before I would consider myself as competent as those hill-men, mountain men, etc.

Hey man, if he carves bows, I say hes a bowyer. :)

If he is in kentucky, I will bet he is either using waxed hemp or sinew.
All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

boog

  • Posts: 10424
Case: he's more likely to shoot up a mcdonalds for selling secret obama sauce on its big macs
Kismet: didn't see you in GQ homey
BadSkeelz: Whatever you say, Kim Jong Boog
Quote from: Tuannon
There is only one boog.